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Adoption Archives

What is the difference between an open and closed adoption?

The decision to place one's child up for adoption is an incredibly difficult one. A North Carolina woman may feel uncertainty and fear as she weighs her ability to take care of her unborn child against the opportunities the child may have if adopted into a supportive and loving home. The woman may wonder if she will be able to live her life not knowing where her baby ended up or how they are doing. A birth mother's ability to stay in contact with a child she placed up for adoption will depend upon whether the adoption was open or closed.

International adoption rule stops couple from bringing kids home

An American couple that had previously completed two successful international adoptions is now facing trouble as it seeks to complete two additional international adoptions for children from the nation of Uganda. The struggle this family is currently experiencing may serve as a good reminder to North Carolina families that wish to grow through international adoption that the requirements of this process can vary greatly and the success of which may depend upon the laws that apply to the nation where the adoptions are to occur.

International adoption can be both challenging and rewarding

The process of adoption creates a legal bond between an adult and a child. While children born to their biological parents are recognized as the legal offspring of those adults, youths who become the sons and daughters of adults who are not their biological parents must do so through adoption. Greenville parents who have chosen to expand their families through adoption understand that the process can be both challenging and rewarding.

Important considerations when pursuing stepparent adoption

The beauty of a family is that it can take on a diversity of sizes and shapes and still be bound together with undying love. Throughout Greenville families exist within single parent households, in arrangements where grandkids live with their grandparents, in blended families created through remarriage, and many other permutations that link together people through blood and the law.

There's no one type of North Carolina adoption

When North Carolina residents think about adoption, it is likely that their minds turn to an infant who has no parents and a kindly couple willing to take the child in as their own. While this scenario certainly describes some adoptions, it does not do justice to the depth and breadth of adoption experiences had by people in the modern United States. There are many reasons for adoption, and many ways it can help families that need to have some legal certainty with regard to domestic relationships.

Is a father's consent needed before adopting a child??

There are many reasons why people decide to adopt children in North Carolina. It could be because they cannot have children of their own or they could want to give children a loving family who might otherwise not have one without adoption. Likewise, there are many different reasons why people decide to give their children up for adoption. While there are plenty of families looking to adopt and many children waiting to be adopted, there is still a lengthy legal process both must go through before an adoption can be completed.

Finality is the hallmark of a good North Carolina adoption

There are myriad reasons that a North Carolinian might want to consider adoption. Whether it is to begin a family or expand one, to take in a child who has no other place to go or to 'legalize' an already existing parental relationship is personal and important. Making certain the process goes smoothly, and results in the desired outcome, is essential to both the adopter and the adoptee.

What is 'pre-placement assessment' in a North Carolina adoption?

Having a family is a goal to which many North Carolina residents aspire. While, traditionally speaking, fulfilling this dream involves having one's own biological children, more and more individuals are opting to adopt for one reason or another. Many times this decision is fueled by a desire to help kids who have lost their own families, and unfortunately, there are many children who fit this description throughout the state and the country. We previously discussed who is eligible to file for adoption, and today we will talk about one step in the process, the 'pre-placement assessment,' also sometimes called a 'home study.'

Who can adopt and be adopted in North Carolina?

Many North Carolina residents have dreamed of having a family of their own since they were young. While some individuals do this through the process of biological birth, there are others ways to create a family. One such method is through the legal adoption process. There may be a myriad of reasons people may turn to adoption, including the inability to conceive a child, wanting a legally recognized parental relationship to a child in one's custody, or simply wanting to help an already existing child find a forever home.

Immigration policy changes shake up international adoption

Many Americans have had wonderful experiences raising children they adopted from other countries. However, adoption is rarely a simple matter, and international adoption presents some unique challenges. When Americans adopt a child from a foreign country, the adoption process is generally controlled by the foreign country's laws. This can mean that unfamiliar legal roadblocks and new political pressures can sometimes present problems for adoptive parents in international adoption.

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